Mumbai colleges having problems

Published by : Step in college

Travel and Safety major problems: In the reopening of Mumbai colleges from February 15 facing major problems like traveling and safety. The State Department of Higher and Technical Education's decision to reopen 50%-capacity colleges beginning on February 15 invited mixed reactions from both colleges and students. The State Department of Higher and Technical Education's decision to reopen 50-percent-capacity colleges beginning on February 15 invited mixed reactions from both colleges and students. Although many feel it is time to take baby steps to get students and staff back to campus, others questioned the move, especially because clear instructions on how to accomplish such a task were not shared by the government or the University of Mumbai (MU).

Reopening Mumbai colleges having major problems

Reopen From 15 February: We only know from now on that colleges need to reopen from 15 February onwards, but the particulars of this move are still unknown to anyone. The Institute will not take any decision to reopen unless we are told exactly how to execute this step,' said Parag Ajgaonkar, principal of NM College, Vile Parle. Ajgaonkar added that while the college has slowly begun planning to eventually bring back students, nothing is certain until the government clarifies its decision. But apart from the issue of a large number of students returning to campus, schools are also concerned about how this would be feasible, especially because during peak hours, trains are still not open to the general public.

It is still possible to reopen schools because students rely on taxis, cars, and school buses to ride, but college students are mainly dependent on trains. How do we expect staff and students to travel because trains are not available to them from 7 am to 1 pm and again from 9 pm? "asked TA Shiware, speaking for Wilson College administration, Worli. He added that before reopening schools, the government should first review travel restrictions.

There are about 3,000 to 5,500 students at various city schools, and another few hundred teaching and non-teaching staff. Also with 50 percent enrollment, schools are concerned that students will be taken back to campus.

Although a sanitization program is already in effect for most institutes, some are worried about the expenses they will incur once students start attending daily lectures. We have 4,000 students plus staff to attend to, and even though just 50% of them are on campus, it would be an immense expense to sanitize every class and ensure sanitizers for both students and staff. Marie Fernandes, principal of St Andrew's College, Bandra, said that the government should look into providing some financial aid to colleges, especially those with a large number of students.

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